Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Installation Instructions for Halex Plywood Underlayment

Plywood Underlayment Installation Instructions for Vinyl and Laminate Floor Covering Types:

Step 1


Make sure that the  Subfloor and  existing subfloor are dry, fastened tightly, structurally sound, and smooth. Reset all or remove protruding nail heads.

Step 2

Remove any soft, decayed or delaminated areas of the subfloor to ensure a proper space for the plywood underlayment. Add ring shank nails to any area of the subfloor that squeaks, has vertical movement, or is warped or cupped.

Step 3

Remove any construction debris, paint, caulk, or drywall compound that has built up on the surface. Fill low spots with patching compound; sand joints, high spots, and patched areas until smooth. In new construction, moisture tests of the existing subfloor and the Halex Plywood Underlayment panels are recommended.

Step 4

Acclimating the Plywood Underlayment which can set the Halex Plywood Underlayment panels to acclimate at the jobsite for 48 hours before they are installed. If  there is enough space, separate the Halex Plywood Underlayment panels and store them vertically around the room to allow air passage on each side.

Step 5

Laying out the Plywood Underlayment Lay out Halex Plywood Underlayment panels at a right angle to the grain of the existing subfloor panels. Install all full panels of Halex Plywood Underlayment in position and ensure that the grain of each panel is running in the same direction.




Step 6

Plywood underlayment panels and sheets must be installed at an offset from subfloor edges by at least 8 inches. Plywood underlayment panels should be staggered so that 4 corners do not meet. Lightly butt plywood underlayment panel edges together.

Step 7

Do not pressure  together, but at the same time do not leave any space. . Leave a minimum gap of 1/4 inch and a maximum gap of 1/2 inch between the plywood underlayment panel edges and the walls for expansion.

Step 8

Cut plywood underlayment sheets where necessary then lay out edges to  edge. Install any edges with jobsite cuts towards the wall. Cut the Plywood Underlayment to Make any long straight cuts from the underside of the plywood underlayment panel using a circular power saw with a fine toothed blade.

Step 9

Fix the blade to extend no more than 3/8' inches through the plywood underlayment to reducte the amount of splintering. Make any short or irregular cuts from the underside of the plywood underlayment panel using a power jig saw with a fine toothed blade. Drill any required holes through the face of the plywood underlayment panel.

Step 10

When choosing the the Plywood Underlayment Fasteners make sure to use  plated ring shank underlayment nails with a 3/16 inch diameter head or double coated chisel point staples with a 1/4 inch maximum crown. Then fasten the length to the selected so that the point will not extend through the bottom side of the subfloor. Do not use uncoated, cement coated, or rosin coated fasteners as they may contribute to staining.



Choosing the Right Brand of Plywood Underlayment

Brands of Plywood to Choose:

How do you go about choosing the right brand of plywood for you home renovation project. For buying plywood as underlayment, I find that brand choice does not matter much.

If concern about water damage and moisture is a big issue for you then, you may want to consider Dry Ply, a brand of coated plywood from Georgia-Pacific that works well as flooring underlayment.

If your project involves vinyl flooring, then you can buy brand-specific plywood. Halex plywood underlayment is tooled specifically to Armstrong, Mannington, Congoleum, and Domco/Tarkett floors. These specific plywood underlayment sheets made just for a particular brand of flooring, but you have brand-specific warranties for each.




Using  Plywood Underlayment as (Sub) Flooring


If you are looking at an inexpesive way to do flooring, you can use Plywood Underlayment, as Finished Flooring. The trick here is to cut the plywood sheets into tiles, about 4x4. You can also do it in 2x2' or 2x4'. This way it doesn't look like you just cheapened out and painted the subfloor. Make sure to properly sketch the layout of the room you plan to floor so you can make the proper adjust with regards to full plywood sheets, and those that you will have to specialty cut to create a uniform look around the room.


You don't need to pad between the subloor and the plywood, although I wouldn't recommend against it. (An acoustical foam underlay will help reduce noise). Lay the plywood sheets on top of the foam padding underlayment. Use glue and then use screws at the corners, as you lay the plywood. You can also use glue alone with no screws, however that might result in some curling of the plywood flooring, and of course you don't want that. For the screws, you can spend a little bit of money, and get something different.

You can use flat face screws, with 2 dimples. They are called tamper resistant screws, to be honest, I don't think the wood species matters. Once you have finished installing and screwing the plywood in, using wood putty or filler to fill the holes ad the sand it smooth. Using plywood (luan/birch) as a top flooring is a unique and cost effective method for home improvement.


Of course the cost cannot be beat, and you can throw down a mat or carpeting in high traffic areas, for example outside the kitchen or hallways. Things to Remember when it comes to Plywood Flooring There isn't going to be an isle in the home hardware or improvement store dedicated to Plywood Flooring, so you may have to think out of the box.

Using Plywood Underlayment For Home Projects

What is Plywood Underlayment?


Plywopod Underlayment is a material you place underneath the vinyl or laminate flooring, to give your finished flooring a smooth and even look. When Plywood Underlayment is placed on the subfloor before you begin to roll out the vinyl or laminate floor covering. This provides some support for the flooring and gives it a finished look to the floor, in addition to support.

Plywood Underlayment is purchased in panels of Plywood with different sizes that make it easy to transport and easy to install. A beginner DIY has the true capacity to do alot of the work with some simple instruction.

Is Plywood A Good Choice For Underlayment?


  Plywood is a plentiful and widely stocked material and is available from many home improvement stores including Lowes and Home Depot. By this I mean that plywood underlayment panels when placed at perpendicularly-aligned layers make this product highly resistant to changes in humidity, water moisture and even limited direct contact with water. While plywood underlayment is not water-resistanct as it will eventually delaminate under prolonged contact with water, it is considered to be resistant to limited water contact.

Should Plywood Underlayment Be Considered the Subfloor?

Plywood underlayment actually rest on top of the subfloor, and is not considered the subfloor itself. The subfloor can be either the concrete base of the floor, or the plywood panels that were installed on joists when the home was constructed. The Plywood panels that we install for the vinyl or laminate flooring are installed on top of this subfloor and will give the vinyl or laminate floor coverings a smooth and depression free look when they are completely installed.

Here is a quick video which will take you through the process of installing plywood underlayment for your home renovation project be it for laminate or for vinyl floor coverings.




What other Types of Underlayment can be used besides Plywood?

Other than Plywood, other types of underlayment which you might consider for you home improvement project are:

Cementboard - This is usually used for tile. Tilework requires a lot of water, and this water may compromise plywood's strength. Cementboard works well for tile. Wonderboard is one brand name of cementboard.

Fiber Cement Board - Is a slick and smooth type of cement board. USG's Fiberock® brand Aqua-Tough is another example.

OSB - Orient-strand board is a  single-layer hybrid wood material which is also  used as underlayment in some projects although plywood usually i the preferred choice. OSB stands up well against moisture.

How to Lay Sheet Vinyl Flooring

Vinyl flooring adhesive coverings are available in an assortment of colors and designs, which make it the top choice for kitchen, bathrooms, utility rooms, and garges. When you install vinyl flooring, it should form a tight bond to the surface below, however if sometimes it's possible that it will show uneven patches or bumps. To fight against this use, Luan, which is a thin underlayment that is actually pretty lightweight and easy to install. While luan will provide a nice surface for you to install the vinyl flooring over.




Plywood Underlayment is 1/4 inch thick and it comes in 4-by-8 sheets. Made from mahogany, luan is made by layering thin strips called vaneers of mahogany which are sealed tightly together with adhesive glue. When layed together and under pressure to form large panels, which is a type of sheet plywood panel. Each luan panel has a rough side and a smooth side. Use the smooth side which should faces upward when installing luan as an underlayment, for you vinyl flooring project.

Installing the underlayment for your vinyl flooring requires certain shop tools, including a staple gun and a circular saw. A utility knife comes in handy for cutting the luan to fit around corners. You should ensure you have a good supply of staples of the 1/4-inch crown staple variety, that are 1 inch long. Plywood underlayment installation does not usually require an adhesive between the subfloor and the luan, but if an adhesive is called for, choose a subfloor adhesive. Use a measure tape as well as marker to make lines which will ensure the accuracy of your cuts in the panels.


Plywood Underlayment should be installed on the top of the subfloor as plywood underlayment panels sheets are not strong enough and can not replace the use of a subfloor. Start the project in one end of the room and then lay a full sheet out, starting in one direction. Leave a 1/16 inch spacing to the walls and the plywood underlayment. Use a staple gun to insert 1/4-inch crown staples every 6 inches across the plane of the luan panel and every 2 inches along the edges. Install additional plywood underlayment in the same manner, and space each panel with a  1/16-inch  gap for expansion between the plywood sheets.



Using a pencil or a piece of chalk mark a line as a guide on the backside of the plywood underlayment. Cut the plywood underlayment with a circular saw from back to front to ensure that the plywood underlayment panels and sheets do not crack or split when cutting. Plywood Underlayment is lightweight and thin so that you should be able to cut areas from the front side with a small camping or jack knife.

Continue to make cuts in the same groove instead of trying to cut through the panel with one strong cut. Because the vinyl flooring shows every bump and depression, it is very important that any staples which you insert into the panels are flush with, or slightly below, the surface of the plywood underlayment. One way to make sure of this is by inserting the edge of a large metal taping knife into the surface of the plywood underlayment. If any staples are sticking up – you’ll hear the clicking sound of metal hitting metal. Tap extending staples lightly with a hammer to drive them flush with the luan surface. Before installing the vinyl, sweep and vacuum all dust and small particles from the luan underlayment.

When you use plywood underlayment for vinyl flooring, it’s better to use sheet vinyl flooring as opposed to vinyl tile. Although plywood underlayment does offer a nice and smooth surface, it does will not withstand moisture, unless it has been waterproofed and it also tends to swell and deteriorate when wet. The seams between vinyl tiles allow water from spills or mopping to soak into the luan, which can result in swollen plywood and lumps that are visible on the surface of the vinyl floor.


Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Anchorage Alaska Hardwood, Plywood, Tiling and Flooring Directory

Anchorage Alaska Hardwood, Plywood, Tiling and Flooring Directory




Choosing the Right Flooring Supplier for Hardwood and Tiles

Jump to Your State | Store




Brands of Plywood Available: -Western Red Cedar , Douglas fir , White Oak or Southern Yellow Pine , Fire retardant lumber and plywood, #1 grade treated lumber, Clear All Heart Redwood, Clear,  knotty Douglas, Aircraft Plywood, Marine Plywood, Luan Plywood,  

Alaska Plywood SuppliersAlaska  Tiling Suppliers
McGee Lumber Co of Charlotte
(866) 210-1147
Curtis & Campbell Inc
907-268-5584
Anchorage AK
Website
Certified Aircraft Composites LLC
(907) 376-7111
Wild S'tile
907-344-5853
Anchorage AK
Website
JEG Services
(907) 444-6425
J & D Interiors Inc
907-349-9685
Anchorage AK
Website
Alaska Painting & Construction
(907) 830-3050
Website
Super Floors
907-272-1080
Anchorage AK
Website
Cozy Carpet Interiors
(907) 694-2699
Website
Alaska Flor-Wall Distributors
907-272-3030
Anchorage AK
Website
Classic Floors Inc
5881 Arctic Blvd # 101
A Plus Professional Cleaning
907-349-7587
Anchorage AK
Website
Dan & Joe's Carpet Service
1017 Bench Ct
Website
Clean Team
902-344-3797
Anchorage AK
Website
Westside Flooring LLC
3620 Jewel Lake Rd
Website
M & J Builders
907-344-2668
Anchorage AK
Website
 Wood Enterprises
Anchorage, AK
Website
Interiors by Horst
907-563-1773
Anchorage AK
Website
Action Maintenance Repair
Eagle River, AK
Website
 Royal Interiors
907-334-9773
Anchorage AK
Website
Giant Dons Flooring America
Eagle River, AK
Website
Dave Bernert & Associates
907-248-5040
Anchorage AK
Website
Hale Construction
Palmer AK
888-896-7418
Website
Valley Floors
907-561-1417
Anchorage AK
Website
Ticker Quality Hardwood Flooring
907-399-3691
Anchorage AK
Website
ABC Carpet Cheap
907-336-4433
Anchorage AK
Website
Advanced Custom Flooring
907-748-4658



Underfoot Enterprises
907-562-1717
Anchorage AK
Website
 Artic Epoxy Flooring
Anchorage AK
907-301-1051
Website
J & M Home Cleaning Service
907-550-6013
Anchorage AK
Website
Artistic Homes
907-529-3333
Anchorage AK
Website
 AVP Distributors
907-222-3097
Anchorage AK
Website
 Floor Seasons Inc
907-333-2212
Anchorage AK
Website
Duraclean by Master Service
907-272-1955
Anchorage AK
Website
 Aurora Flooring
907-561-7766
Anchorage AK
Website
Alaska Interiors Warehouse
907-563-8810
Anchorage AK
Website
 Alaska Commercial Carpeting
907-245-0011
Anchorage AK
Website
Cronin Co
907-562-2272
Anchorage AK
Website
 Artic Flooring Co
907-561-3203
Anchorage AK
Website
5th Avenue Oriental Rug Show
907-277-1883
Anchorage AK
Website
 TTS Interiors
907-345-5780
Anchorage AK
Website
Disigner Rug Center
907-277-7847
Anchorage AK
Website
Floor Safety USA
907-336-7233
Anchorage AK
Website
 Perfection Craft & Construction
907-276-7777
Anchorage AK
Website
 O'Farrell Flooring
907-344-1790
Anchorage AK
Website
Top Hat Tile
907-744-1440
Anchorage AK
Website
 TLC Flooring
907-240-8209
Anchorage AK
Website
All In One Rapid Repair
907-258-8827
Anchorage AK
Website
 Frontier Wood Care
907-334-9289
Anchorage AK
Website
H P Carpet Service
907-336-4728
Anchorage AK
Website
 Great North Floors
907-677-7583
Anchorage AK
Website
Tico Services Inc
907-952-8085
Anchorage AK
Website
 Curtis Flooring
907-334-5722
Anchorage AK
Website
Frank Street
907-272-0740
Anchorage AK
Website
Northern Lights Flooring
907-348-6028
Anchorage AK
Website
 Kens Carpet Cleaning
907-744-0381
Anchorage AK
Website
 Down-Right Flooring Service
907-566-1177
Anchorage AK
Website
 
J & M Diversified
905-301-1917
Anchorage AK
Website
 Aasl General Contracting Corporation
907-344-5099
Anchorage AK
Website
Gary's Floor Covering
907-332-1023
Anchorage AK
Website
 Leo G Volmer
907-333-0096
Anchorage AK
Website
Pacific Tile Supply
907-563-5303
Anchorage AK
Website
 All Around Flooring
907-336-2874
Anchorage AK
Website
Floors Unlimited
907-338-3624
Anchorage AK
Website
 Wildwood Floors
907-563-0050
Anchorage AK
Website
LPV Inc
907-561-4161
Anchorage AK
Website
Grazzini Bros
907-334-9737
Anchorage AK
Website
 Flair Interiors
907-522-7421
Anchorage AK
Website
 Commercial Contractors Inc
907-563-1911
Anchorage AK
Website
W & W Co of Alaska
907-243-4804
Anchorage AK
Website
 Mad City Flooring
907-222-6228
Anchorage AK
Website
A Installations
907-278-3111
Anchorage AK
Website
 Alaska Wholesale Flooring
907-644-8817
Anchorage AK
Website
 
Cornerstone Tile
907-274-8453
Anchorage AK
Website
 Angel's Touch Maintenance
907-229-7074
Anchorage AK
Website
Ramsey Carpet Service
907-349-5223
Anchorage AK
Website
 Quality Flooring
907-929-2404

Anchorage AK
Website
Carpet Express
907-522-5404
Anchorage AK
Website
Big Bob's Flooring Outlet
907-561-2121
Anchorage AK
Website
 Supreme Carpet Service
907-272-2912
Anchorage AK
Website
Factory Direct Carpets
907-349-5088
Anchorage AK
Website
Factory Direct Carpets
907-349-5088
Anchorage AK
Website
North Star Flooring
907-344-7561
Anchorage AK
Website
Alaska Stone Care
907-229-8286
Anchorage AK
Website
Eagle Hardwood Floors & Tile
907-345-9354
Anchorage AK
Website
Rothewell Enterprises
907-332-0373
Anchorage AK
Website
 Green Building Concepts
907-830-1609
Anchorage AK
Website
Affordable Hardwood Floors
907-245-5722
Anchorage AK
Website
Eastside Carpet Company
907-562-7444
Anchorage AK
Website
 Anchor Tile
907-345-3733
Anchorage AK
Website
A'la Round Flooring Distributors
907-562-2223
Anchorage AK
Website
Carpets Cleaned by Kip
907-338-3995
Anchorage AK
Website
 Flooring Designs
907-349-1274
Anchorage AK
Website
Rep Tile
907-345-3843
Anchorage AK
Website
 Northwest Hardwood Floors
907-696-1237
Anchorage AK
Website
Custom Stone Works
907-646-7983
Anchorage AK
Website
 Universal Floor Care Inc
907-373-5166
Anchorage AK
Website
Grout Doctor
907-770-2990
Anchorage AK
Website
 Nuther Brothers Inc
907-696-2244
Anchorage AK
Website
Rino's Tile & Stone
907-743-1076
Anchorage AK
Website
Northern Flooring Design Center
907-745-5700
Anchorage AK
Website
 
 Northwest Hardwood Floors
907-696-1237
Anchorage AK
Website
Ramey's Floor Covering
907-745-2468
Anchorage AK
Website
Dunkin Services
907-775-1431
Anchorage AK
Website
 Northwest Carpet Company LLC
907-694-1157
Anchorage AK
Website
Classic Floors Inc
907-563-2160
Anchorage AK
Website
 
 Jordan's Carpet Center Inc
907-562-2022
Anchorage AK
Website
 Environ Commercial Services
907-727-2665
Anchorage AK
Website
 L H Contracting
907-332-3225
Anchorage AK
Website
 Elaine S Baker & Associates Inc
907-276-4829
Anchorage AK
Website
 ABC Painting & Construction Inc
907-336-8484
Anchorage AK
Website
Jungle Jim's Floor Coverings
907-563-8810
Anchorage AK
Website
 
Giant Don's Flooring America
907-522-5775
Anchorage AK
Website
 Mat-Valley Tile & Stone Inc
907-644-8453
Anchorage AK
Website
 Timberline Maintenance & Construction
907-344-9600
Anchorage AK
Website
 Sav-On Cabinets
907-561-5900
Anchorage AK
Website
 Decor Industries Inc
907-562-2565
Anchorage AK
Website
 
 Palace of Rugs
907-276-0002
Anchorage AK
Website
 Alaska Marble & Granite
907-277-7625
Anchorage AK
Website
 CBM
907-522-2599
Anchorage AK
Website
 Poppert Milling
907-376-8774
Anchorage AK
Website
 Granite City Alaska
907-964-6900
Anchorage AK
Website
Heaven's Best
907-622-6840
Anchorage AK
Website
 
 Advanced Floor Coatings
888-265-9649
Anchorage AK
Website
 Miracle Method Surface Restoration
888-333-4407
Anchorage AK
Website
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 



Saturday, February 15, 2014

Using Brad or Finish Nails to Attach Luan Plywood

Best Nails to Use to Attach Luan Plywood: 

Brad Nails or Finish Nails:

It is best to use brad nails, and fasten the 1/4 luan plywood to the carcass. They use brad nails for attaching the plywood to each other while you then use adhesive glue to secure the hold. It will be the glue that will hold the plywood together for the long term. The nails just hold the plywood together while you glue. The best glue that I can recommend is Titebond II.

How to Use a Finish Nailer or Brad Nailer 




How to Use a Nail Gun


Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Installing Plywood Paneling Over Sheetrock

How to Install 1/4 plywood Over Sheetrock (1/4 inch Luan Plywood Installation)

 When you install plywood over sheetrock as an interior finish ensure that the plywood has been secured so there is no movement. Once this step has been completed, you'll need a foam underlayment. This will allow for the sound insulation as well as to expand and contract as normal depending on temperture conditions. If your sheet vinyl has the backing on it, ( some do) then of course you don t need it, as some vinyl may come pre-installed with the foam backing already attached. If you are looking at using the plywood paneling to hold in shelving you might want to go with a sturdy grade over 1/4 inch, to 1/2 inch. Although the standard variety is 1/4 plywood.

 Things to Keep in Mind : Sheetrock may be required for Fire Codes

 Best Panels to Use of Sheetrock

Covering Instead of Plywood :FRP or ABS panels | The benefits of using FRP Panels or ABS panels is that they are strong and easy to clean.

 FRP Panels which actually stands for Fiberglass Reinforced Polyester, is actually used in office buildings, and retail space, it is quite hardy for any project that you might have in mind for covering over Sheetrock with plywood.

You can tell its FRP Paneling when you see it, as it is white with a dimpled texturing.

 ABS Panels are Acrylonitrile-Butadine-Styrene, is a tough plastic sheet they make many things out of, it can be scratched easier than FRP. ABS panels and FRP Panels are actually finished and easy to install, and are used for many heavy duty commercial interiors that get regular abuse.

So if you are looking at covering Sheetrock, this would be the better choice over plywood depending on the application. Of course, if you are working a garage or machine shop then 1/4 inch plywood might be the better solution.

 Technical Term: "Wainscoting" for applying Plywood Paneling over Sheetrock